Searching the Archives

Have you ever wondered what was in the Physician Assistant History Society’s archives? Have you been looking for extra resources to give your research a boost? Do you need just one more source to cite before you turn in that paper? Check out the Archival Research section of the PAHx website! https://pahx.org/archival-research/

The Archival Research section has the finding aid for every collection housed in the PAHx archives.

A finding aid is a document containing detailed information about a specific collection of papers or records.

On the webpage, you will see the names of each collection in the archive, a description of what is in that collection, and a link to the full finding aid.

Finding Aid Snippet

The full finding aid will give you more detailed information on who contributed the collection, the historical background and importance of the collection, search terms that apply to that collection, and the container list (what the collection contains, ex. correspondence, meeting minutes, etc.)

For a more detailed How-to-Use Guide, please click here: https://pahx.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Archival-Collections-2nd-Try.pdf

If you would like a closer look at something or have questions about what exactly a folder contains, drop a line to the friendly PAHx archivist! (contactus@pahx.org) She is here to answer all your archive questions and to help you better search what will best meet your research needs. All documents and materials in collections are for educational purposes only and cannot be reproduced without express permission from the PAHx and/or the copyright holder.

Also, when citing archival material, follow this format:

Name of item, date. Name of collection item is from. Name of archive/repository, archive/repository’s location.

Example:

Correspondence on Commissioning of PAs, April 1980. J. Jeffery Heinrich Papers. Physician Assistant History Society, Johns Creek, GA, USA.

Make sure to read the descriptions of collections and not to just glance at the name. In archives it is traditional to name a collection for the person(s) who donated it, not what the collection contains. For example, The Don Pedersen Collection has meeting minutes for early NCCPA committee meetings and has no materials on Don Pedersen himself.

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